Organizing My WordPress Site

I am attempting to make my site more organized and will soon be changing my header to a photo of my own rather than using one of WordPress’s stock photos and colors. I also will be adding additional links from one article to another.

computer organization
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I believe in letting my readers know what is going on here at all times rather than surprise everyone with the new look. Please bear with me if something goes wrong (crossing my fingers).

I am taking a course on WordPress and search engine optimization (SEO) from Yoast in order to make my site more SEO friendly and easier to navigate.

Here is that free excellent beginner’s course on WordPress given by Yoast. (Take note WordPress users: Your dashboard-Admin will work differently depending on whether you are being hosted by WordPress or someone else, e.g., SiteGround.)

This technical stuff is not my ballyhoo. I expect many of you out there are in the same boat, as I see so many questions appear in Facebook. Many of us tech amateurs are trying to start web sites and blog, and I found it helpful to find one place where WordPress was explained from beginning to end rather than piecemeal. I prefer the entire story in order starting at Chapter 1 and proceeding through to the final chapter, and that is the way this Yoast course is presented. Plus, you learn by video AND by reading, with a short quiz at the end of each section. Kuddos, guys.

I hope to eventually link to Instagram and Pinterest, where I have several albums of photos illustrating my historical novels, Unspoken and Here We Stand.

Best of luck to us all in these overwhelming times.

A Loss for Words?

 

Photo by Alie Krohn, Photostream Creative Commons

Photo by Alie Krohn, Photostream Creative Commons

“What the hell kind of people read books about words?”

I love this. I took it from a interview with one of my favorite people who is also an author and a word wizard, Arthur Plotnik. I don’t know of anyone who makes reading about words, or how to “write words better” so much fun.

I don’t know what I would do without his book, Spunk & Bite. Mine looks a bit like a squished porcupine with all the tabs I have added for quick access to all the info.

Take a look at the interview on The Grammarist, if you’ve a mind, and you will not only learn something, but I bet you will smile doing it: http://grammarist.com/nofront/interview-with-arthur-plotnik/

 

SOMEONE HAS

 

IMG_2894Ever wish someone would surf through all those writing, publishing and marketing blogs, pick out the best and most informative ones and drop them in your email?

Someone has.

His name is Gene Lempp, and once a week he compiles a list of all the best and lists them on his blog at http://genelempp.wordpress.com/

He even categorizes and writes a short synopses of each so you can choose which ones you want to read.

Gene is another special example of how writers go out of their way to help one another. Is there any other “business” like this?

Thank you, Gene!

Life In These United States

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Van at Slab City, California desert

Van at Slab City, California desert

If you live in the United States, you are familiar with those horrid drug commercials on TV.  Yesterday, there were three in a row for three different drugs. It’s not bad enough the pharmaceutical companies screw us financially, now they make us listen to them yant while waiting for our programs.  I record most of my programs these days, so I can skip through the commercials, but my husband still has to watch his football games live.

I did get a laugh out of it all though, when we received a “thermarest-type” pad in the mail from Overstock.com.  You know how the drug companies are required to chant (as fast as possible) their warnings at the end of the commercial?  This came with the pad.  You have to get through to the end:

WARNING!

“This product is or contains urethane foam.  Urethane foam is flammable!  Urethane foam will burn if exposed to open flame or other sufficient heat source.  Do not expose urethane foam to open flame or other sufficient heat source.  Do not expose urethane foam to open flames or any other direct or indirect high temperature ignition sources, such as smoldering cigarettes, space heaters, naked lights, burning operations, welding or other heat sources.  These can cause urethane foam to ignite.
Once ignited, urethane foam will burn rapidly, release great heat and consume oxygen at a high rate.  The lack of oxygen may cause death or serious personal injury by suffocation.
Burning urethane foam will also emit hazardous gases.  These hazardous gases can cause death or serious personal injury.
Once ignited, urethane foam is difficult to extinguish.  Foam fires that appear to be extinguished may smolder and reignite.  Always have fire officials determine whether a fire has been extinguished.
We wish you many comfortable nights sleep.

Whoever wrote that one, could never write decent fiction.  Or could he?

Be Your Character

My knees and arms are crossed and I’m trying to breathe slowly and evenly.  My fingers are cold, and I’m gritting my teeth.  Shoulders tight.  Mind buzzing furiously–put something down.  Now.

I just did.

Be in your character.  Write the emotion.  Write from where you dream.

I closed my eyes and went into my dreamspace.  I had no idea how to begin this blog, so I connected to the place I was in and wrote about that.

Sometimes the ideas come whirling out from mind to fingers to keys, and sometimes writing is like, well, pulling teeth.  I am sure you know what I mean.

What I am blogging about today is:  Don’t merely write about your character, be your character–particularly in what are, or should be, emotion-filled moments or scenes.  If you ever wanted to be an actor, this is your chance.  I close my eyes, relax, breathe deep and slow, and imagine I am that person in the situation I have created.  How do I feel?  What do I feel?  What is my body doing?  What am I thinking?  Can I think?  What do I hear, smell, see?

Being your character is handy for other scenes, as well.  Your character is lying in the grass.  How does the world look from down there?  Does she see a ladybug crawling up a blade?  Is the grass green with spring or dry in summer?  What do you smell?  Does she have allergies that make her nose tickle or make her sneeze, her eyes water?  What else does she feel?  Is the grass damp from early morning dew?

Of course, you can’t bring this kind of detail into every scene.  Detail only the scenes where such moments are important to character development, mood, plot, etc.  Choosing which moments are important is part of what good writing is all about–when to show and when to tell.  For example, perhaps you have a male character who, so far, has shown only aggression, anger, and contempt toward everyone.  You might have a key scene where, when alone, he  shows kindness and compassion for a hurt animal.  This scene would be best written in great detail in order to impress it upon your reader’s mind.  Aha, this character has more to him than he shows to the world–what does this scene mean?  You have made a flat, one-dimensional character intriguing.  Readers like mysteries and surprises, as long as they make sense.

How do I describe all these emotions?  Every serious writer should have a good Thesaurus.  Mine is a big, fat Roget’s International Thesaurus, and I have sticky-tagged much of it for quick reference.  Even better, a couple awesome ladies have just published The Emotion Thesaurus for all us writers which you can find on their blog here.  For a limited time they are giving away an Emotion Amplifier download.  Check it out–their blog is one of the best on the web for writers.

I watched Game of Thrones last night and what a scene between Lady Stark and Jamie Lanister!  I watched her as he went on about Ned Stark’s betrayal of her with another woman and imagined how I would write the emotions she was feeling at that moment.  Powerful stuff!

Cat, Cottonwoods and Tags

Dickens (my cat) is whopping my shoulder with his tail.  One of his favorite spots is on the back of my chair while I tap on my MacBook.  He can keep an eye on things outside the window and, at the same time, remind me that it’s nearly time for his dinner.

We have arrived at lovely Riverside RV Park in Bayfield, Colorado, on an overcast but fairly warm, 70 degrees, afternoon.  I have an internet connection here!  Though the country silence of our friends’ land is preferable to the nearly constant woosh of nearby Highway 160.  We do have spring-leafing cottonwoods, aspens and a nearby creek.

Today’s writing subject is, you guessed it, tags, without which a reader wouldn’t know who is speaking that marvelous dialogue you just wrote.

One of my favorite and, I think, most useful books on writing is Arthur Plotnik’s Spunk and Bite.

He states in the beginning of the book that there are situations where every rule can and, sometimes should, be broken.  A good writer must know when and how.

Many writing gurus (experts, maybe) declare that you must never use any tag but Said.  At least limit yourself to said, asked and replied.  Arthur Plotnik believes that this rule should apply  “when the context and content of the dialogue, narrative description and the speaker’s character” are clear.  He used this example:

A cry of terror broke from Dorian Gray’s lips, and he rushed between the painter and the screen.  “Basil,” he said, looking very pale, “you must not look at it.”  (Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray)

Adding anything more than said in this tag would have been redundant.

Don’t use a tag that calls too much attention to itself (unless, of course, for some reason, you want it to make it stand out–humor, perhaps?).

Use descriptive tags when:

  • The sound of the speaker’s voice is important, but not clear in the dialogue.
  • To provide counterpoint where one speaker’s voice is neutral and the other speaker’s is not (anger v. calm)
  • When a character speaks against the line (“I love you,” he said angrily).

In the end, as the writer, you have the last word as to when you need to use an emphatic tag.  Only, as always, consider your reader.

To Be or Not To Be

These days, it’s hard to be anywhere when you have no internet or phone connection.  Absence is one of the trials of traveling around the country like we are–you never know when you will be out of touch.  I’m writing this from the local Ignacio, New Mexico, library on the Ute Indian Reservation.  All you readers and writers out there, remember to support your local library!

“There are eight computers lined up against the south wall of the library.”

Hey writers, do you know what is wrong with that sentence?  It reeks of dullness.  When I read it, I think, “So what?”  Unless, of course, your point is:  “Here’s a list of the things I see, a rather uninteresting list and they don’t do much but sit there.”   Your reader doesn’t know why, but is disappointed and unexcited by your writing when you use a “to be” verb phrase, especially at the beginning of a sentence, paragraph, or chapter.  Like Hamlet, these items exist, but don’t contain any action.  Even Hamlet wasn’t all that interesting until he decided to act.

It is, there is, there are, etc.  When you are editing your work, look for these “to be” verb phrases and replace them with more interesting, active verbs.  Doing so might even lead you into a nice metaphor or simile.  As in:  “Eight computers strategically line the south wall of the library like little soldiers waiting for duty.”  Okay.  You may think the sentence is a little silly, but at least it’s interesting.

So, find these little devils and perk up your writing by replacing them.  You will be surprised by how much better your story or article will read.  I was.

I may be posting from the Sky Ute Casino next time.  They are supposed to have a pretty good buffet.  Oops, was that a “to be” beginning back there?

Can’t Get Excited About Your Scene?

I have done the worst thing a blogger can do.  Disappear.

Everything has changed.  Nothing has changed.  No one cares, I bet.

I think I have become a better writer.  I am still learning.  Maybe I can help you to become a better writer, too.  Or at least write something interesting here, mainly for the beginning writer like me.  Still beginning, though I have been at this for five years.

I am self-taught.  That means I don’t have a Masters in Writing.  I have taken classes.  I read books and blogs on writing.  I have subscribed to The Writer magazine all these years, and I study it, keep all the articles in appropriate files and refer to them often.  The Writer is one hundred twenty-five years old this year!

Notice how I wrote that number out?  Please do.  Unless your number is abnormally long, like 1,346, or a year, or . . . it’s best to check a good dictionary, which will tell you which numbers should be written out.  If you don’t have one, get one.  Get a good thesaurus, too.  Don’t depend on an on-line synonym guide.

Today the most important thing I learned was:  If you can’t get excited about writing a scene, don’t write it.  If you aren’t excited about writing it, your reader won’t be excited about reading it.  Why did it take me all this time to figure that out?

It’s important information I have to get across to the reader.  The character, in this case, She, thinks about a past instance that began her life search for information about her mysterious family.  She can’t her mom or anyone to talk about it, so she’s going to get her best friend, He, to help her.  Boring to write, boring to read–all those thoughts, and where do I put her while thinking them, etc., etc., etc.?

Put this stuff in the action, in the dialogue.  Bit by bit it comes out when She explains to He why She needs his help.  Simple, huh?

Readers like dialogue more than description.  Readers like action even more.  Add a little action to your dialogue.  Put some conflict in there, too.  Voila–it’s no longer boring.  It was fun to write, too.

Where do you put your boring stuff to give it punch?

Show and Tell

Remember Show and Tell from Elementary School?  It wasn’t Show versus Tell, or Show instead of Tell, it was Show and Tell.

Show, don’t Tell, is what the writer is continually told, and this is good advice . . . usually.  Do not tell us your character is afraid; show us his fear.

As P. Bradley Robb says, every rule has an exception.   Knowing when to show and when to tell is the sign of a writer who has learned her craft, of a writer who has found his voice.

One instance telling makes sense is when showing will slow down the pace when it is appropriate to speed it along.  It always takes more time, more words to show a thing than to tell it.  Sometimes showing can get wrapped up in unnecessary detail, relating a writer’s knowledge, knowledge that is not necessary to the plot, the scene or the character.

Another would be filling in background information, description or events that are not as important as scenes that you want to stand out, those which you will show.

It is always a case of:  Is this scene, description, character trait important enough that it must be shown? How will showing affect the tension and pace of the story?  If important showing slows down the pace too much, perhaps it is misplaced.

Back to my own novel now — hope I have shown everything at the right time and place.

More Joy of Writing Sex

Here is more from The Joy of Writing Sex by Elizabeth Benedict, and whatever else comes to mind.

  • Narrate from with the characters’ bodies and minds and connect them with their physical surroundings.  A buttock in warm sand (or cold), the bite of a mosquito – something or anything that contributes to the mood you want to create.
  • They may not speak, but they might.  Dialogue can reveal your characters, create conflict, resolve conflict, reveal attitudes toward sex.  Perhaps a little humor?  Talk leading up to sex can be more fun and interesting than the sex, itself.
  • Be specific and add a little detail, but not necessarily explicit.  Use details that reveal emotion or distinguish one character from another, time, place, status.
  • Surprise!  Something about the scene the reader remembers, which is not necessarily a great orgasm.  What happened that was unexpected?

In writing about sex, remember the realities of the world in which you are writing.  Today we must consider AIDS, how the characters feel about it, safe sex – are they reckless, restrained, what controls their decisions?  There is a great deal of exploration to be done here when writing about the gay community, in particular.  As the author states, “Gay characters, and the primarily gay writers who create them, live in an environment in many ways defined by the ravages and repercussions of AIDS.  Illness and death have an inescapable immediacy and weight for the infected and uninfected alike; fictional characters, like their real-life counterparts, often exist in extremis, forced at every turn to explore the fusion of love, sex, mortality, and grief.”

Because of AIDS, the year and location in which you set your characters is crucial and will vary between gay and straight couples.

  • In our current time, most gays take practicing safe sex for granted.
  • You can use the preparation for safe sex between straight couples for further revelations about your characters.  Embarrassment about the condom?  Use it.

Here are titles of following chapters:  “Losing Your Cherry and Other First times to Remember; Great Expectations: The Wedding Night and the Honeymoon; Life Sentences: Husbands and Wives; Three Cheers for Adultery; Your Place or Mine: Recreational Sex; The Illicit: Sex Forbidden by Law, History, and Politics; Solo Sex: Alone, on the Phone, and on the Internet.”

You get the picture.

We love to talk about it, don’t we?  Now write and have fun.  This can be the most fun writing of all.  Truly.